Rick Springfield on Tinder?

Sideswiped smile

What, Rick Springfield is on Tinder?

Before any rumors get started, he’s on Tinder the same way he is a creepy psychologist, a demented pastor and Lucifer – as part of a role. In real life, he’s a longtime married man so there’ll be no swiping right except for in your fantasies – and on an upcoming YouTube Originals show.

This announcement came today:

Here’s the official trailer:

Although my dating days were before swiping right was a thing, I’ve heard several Tinder stories from my sister and the dating site definitely sounds like good inspiration for a dating comedy series.

This multi-generational eight-episode comedy series about relationships and dating in the digital age is based on a true story from Carly Craig, who stars in the show.

A description of the show from Broadway World:

A lifetime of saying no has left “Olivia” single and miserable on her 35th birthday. This workaholic verging on a breakdown vows to plunge into the hellish world of Tinder by dating all 252 of her matches. She is spurred on by her sister “Jayne” – a young married woman experiencing a seven-year itch. The sisters are joined by their recently widowed mother, “Mary,” who is now also a part of the online dating scene.

RS has talked about wanting to do some more acting and this looks like the show was shot in Los Angeles (the Dodger Stadium sign sighting) so this was probably filmed between two weekends of shows because his tour schedule has been pretty heavy this year between the full band shows, the solo shows, the symphony shows, the ’80s cruise and “The Snake King” special performances.

Did all of that really happen this year? Wow, and there’s still half a year to go.

I am so glad that he’s not playing another creepy character. Or is he? Although he looks like himself in the trailer, he is playing a Tinder date, so I guess we’ll have to watch to see what kind of date he turns out to be in “Sideswiped” on July 25!

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Farewell to soundcheck access

It used to be that Rick Springfield fans could purchase a soundcheck package where they could sit in during the band’s soundcheck session and then afterward they could briefly meet him for autographs, pictures and a chance to share any personal thoughts about the impact that he’s had on their life.

This past week, the Rick Springfield Official Merchandise site announced that effective immediately, that option was being changed to a VIP Backstage Experience, which is described on the site as:

About an hour before Rick hits the stage, you will be escorted backstage by our VIP Host to a private room where Rick will perform a song, and you’ll catch a rare and personal side of him as he engages the few fans in attendance. You will be able to meet Rick, get a few autographs and a photo taken during this time. You also have the option of adding a guitar to this package.

The cost of this experience is $349.99, $724.99 with the guitar. There’s also a VIP Collector’s Edition Guitar Package for $2,499.99, which is described as this:

This is your chance to take home the very guitar that Rick plays on stage during the iconic song, Jessie’s Girl. This limited edition guitar features the artwork from the album that started it all: Working Class Dog. Rick will sign, date and label the guitar by city, making this is truly a one of a kind collector’s piece. Oh yeah, and it may be a little sweaty.

After the show, you and two of your friends will have the opportunity to meet Rick in his backstage dressing room. He’ll personally present the guitar to you, and you’ll have the opportunity for a bit of a chat, and of course, photos and autographs. It’s going to be a night you’ll remember for a very long time.

Only one guitar is sold per show, and there’s only so many shows in a tour! Hurry to secure your collector’s edition Working Class Dog guitar.

Don’t get me wrong, these experiences sound great, too, although the idea of sitting in on a soundcheck sounded really cool because it’s a little glimpse into what musicians do to prepare for a show. (Many years ago I was able to listen to a soundcheck for Sting and although I was standing up in the stands at the empty amphitheater and not up close, it was still a cool experience. To be able to do that standing right there with my favorite rock star on stage would have been incredible.)

But alas, it looks like that opportunity is gone. I’m grateful to the fans who have shared videos of the soundcheck experience in the past so I have an idea of what it was like.

You know what would be really cool? How about some “exclusive contests” for meet & greet opportunities through the RS fan club? (Hint, hint to the powers that be.)

RS is very generous with his time for his fans so I’m glad that he’s continuing these meet & greet and opportunities, even with these changes and although they are still out of my budget. I’m hoping that he’ll be doing some book tours with his next book since I missed out on those. (When I “rediscovered” him back in 2014, it was three months after his visit to an Arizona bookstore after the release of “Magnificent Vibration.”)

In other Rick Springfield news, here’s a recent video from Vintage Guitar where RS talks about his guitars (and alien-fighting capabilities) inside his studio:

Here’s another recent interview:

A recent article on newscentermaine.com mentions the second novel and also that he’s working on an album of his songs played with a symphony. That sounds cool (and wouldn’t it be cool to see that on DVD, too, like the “Stripped Down” set?)

His summer tour will bring him about 15 minutes from my house in August so I hope to catch that show since I didn’t make it to any shows last year. He has more than 20 shows between now and then, including symphony shows in Columbus, Ohio; Nashville; San Diego; and Park City, Utah. Such a busy guy!

Words of advice to those struggling with depression

Rick Springfield’s Twitter response to the tragic news about Anthony Bourdain’s death was so meaningful, as RS both shows compassion for Bourdain’s family and loved ones, but also demonstrates that he understands what Bourdain went through, as it’s something that he’s dealt with for most of his life. (Was it wrong that the “award-winning depressionist” part cracked me up among all the sadness?)

Although Rick Springfield’s most recent CD “The Snake King” was such a shift from his previous music, it’s pretty amazing that somehow it seems to fit the mood of the world lately. As if his musical spirit was saturated by all the things going in on in the world and it came out through him in those songs. He’s already said that was the case for him personally, but lately it feels as if that tone fits the world in general.

That being said, perhaps some people who may be suffering from depression could benefit from some of the wisdom RS has shared about his depression:

People magazine: “‘Suicide Manifesto’ is stuff I think about. I’ve been close to it,” he said about his forthcoming song from his new album, The Snake King. “When Robin Williams and Chester [Bennington and Chris Cornell] and those guys … I didn’t go, ‘Oh that’s terrible.’ I went, ‘I get it.’ I get being that lost and dark.”

Adding, “You’re in so much pain that you just want it to end. I have been there and I know what it’s like and I understand. It’s just part of your makeup.”

“I’ve taken Prozac and all that kind of stuff and I meditate. Meditation is the only thing that takes me out of it. If I truly meditate and focus and get to that place, I’m not depressed. No matter what’s going on. But it’s pretty hard,” he shared.

“I’m alive and well. Anyone says, ‘How you doing?’ I never go, ‘Great.’ Because it’s bulls—. I go, ‘I’m okay — I’m there.’ Sometimes I’ll go, ‘F—ing horrible, I’ve had a terrible day.’” Springfield said of talking to other people about his emotions.

“We’ve all had the social front and it just makes me feel like such a liar when I go home and I look in the mirror and I go, ‘Really, you said that to somebody? That everything’s great and you’re feeling awesome? That’s bulls—,’ ” he continued.

Adding, “I’m at the point now in my life where I want to do what’s truthful.”

Extra: As for what goes on in his head when he is hit with depression and suicidal thoughts, Rick shared, “You’re not trying to hurt anyone else. You’re not trying to hurt your family. You’re just trying to get away from the thing that you can’t get away from.”

“You know, you’re always kind of on the edge of the cliff with depression, and you gotta deal with it the way you do,” Springfield continued. “I’m doing my best to pursue the life that I want even though the hand drags me down every now and then.”

Look to the Stars: An accomplished actor, writer and Grammy Award-winning singer and songwriter, Rick Springfield received the Beatrice Stern Media Award for his work as a mental health advocate who has openly talked about his depression and suicide attempt as teen. “I grew up thinking I’ve just got to become famous, successful, wealthy, have a house with a wife and kids and it (my depression) will all go away. In 1985, I had all those things and I wanted to kill myself. I realized the lie of fame right there—that it wasn’t going to heal me.”

Springfield’s award was presented by his longtime friend, Emmy-winning actor Doug Davidson who shared with the audience that he too, struggles with depression. “We all know 16 is a difficult time for anyone, and it was for Rick, too. He didn’t like the way he looked. He thought his ankles were too thin. He hated his nose. This is teenage angst. But by talking about it, he became a role model for teens everywhere. When you find out a rock superstar went through the same kind of angst and depression you’re going through, it helps you realize you can get through it, too.”

People magazine: Springfield —who has been married to his wife Barbara Porter, 56, for 33 years — says his family, including Liam, 32, and his younger son Josh, 28, help him remain thankful for his life.

“It’s like your heart beating. It’s something that’s there. I’m always aware of my family, absolutely, and the love that we have,” he says. “Being grateful is very important to trying to combat depression.”

Taking things day by day, Springfield hopes to one day forgive himself for his past mistakes and enjoy life a bit more with his loved ones.

“I look back on my regrets with great relish and my successes, not so much,” says the singer, who wrote about his multiple infidelities in his 2010 memoir Late, Late at Night. “In the end I’m always trying to prove my worth to myself which is what depression is all about.”

And this article on CBSnews.com from eight years ago, after the release of “Late, Late at Night”:

In the rash of recent teen suicides, Springfield, now 61, has a message for kids who feel as isolated and hopeless as he once did: Stick it out, it gets better.

“I know what it’s like,” he said Tuesday on “Good Morning America.” “You just want out. You want the pain to stop. Give yourself a year. Your life will change.” …

As for his message to teens on the edge: “Nothing remains the same,” he says. “I would have missed out on a lot of amazing stuff in my life.”

Quite a commute

I’ve been traveling the past couple of weeks, which has included time in planes, trains and automobiles.

During my journey, I’ve thought about the people who travel regularly for their jobs, such as musicians. Specifically, Rick Springfield. With about 100 shows all around the country each year (and sometimes internationally), the life of our favorite rock star must include lots of security lines, seat-belt and oxygen-mask demonstrations and waiting at the baggage claim carousel.

Sometimes people will snap a picture of him in the airplane or standing at baggage claim. Other times, reporters accost him as he heads into the airport. On one flight, a group of girls sang “Jessie’s Girl” on the plane after recognizing him. None of these things have ever happened to me during my travels, fortunately.

RS has often said that he gets paid for traveling rather than for playing music because he enjoys playing music so much, he’d do it for free. Lucky for him, he gets paid for both traveling and playing music. What a great gig.

 

Whenever I’m at the airport, especially at LAX, I can’t help but keep an eye out for RS, just in case. I’m not really sure what I would actually do if I saw him, but I look anyway. I recently flew into the Burbank, California airport and during the short walk through the terminal from the gate to the outside baggage claim, “Jessie’s Girl” played over the loudspeakers. Out of all the songs in the whole world that could have played in those few minutes, I thought it was pretty funny that it would be an RS song. Of course, I interpreted that as my personal welcome to Southern California from RS. (If you’ve read any of this blog, you may have learned that my thinking process is about age 13 when it comes to RS, so you shouldn’t be too surprised.)

I’m happy to report that I did recently spot RS at the Los Angeles International Airport, although it was in a different scenario than I had hoped. I had some time before I needed to get to the gate to board my flight so I wandered into a bookstore in the terminal. As I scanned the books on the shelves, I saw RS right there on a bottom shelf staring out at me.

Late Late at Night

I’ll be at LAX later this week so MAYBE I’ll run into him if he heads to Las Vegas early for his show there this weekend. I’ll look out for him just in case.